ENGINE NUMBER

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womble63
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ENGINE NUMBER

Post by womble63 »

hi all
new to the group just purchased my first morris minor 1954 splitscreen ,but need a bit of help with engine number as it says SRA3 R K90862 then A A underneath it on the engine plate and the engine is painted gold its ment to be a 803 gold seal from what i was told by the owner but cant find anythink in relation to this engine number and where it is from on the chasey plate its says APHM 70732 ,SO WAS THIS SENT BACK AND RECODITIONED OR IS IT AN OLD ENGINE SOME ONE HAS JUST THROWN IN
MANY THANKS FOR ANY HELP
ANDY



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Mecanglais
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Re: ENGINE NUMBER

Post by Mecanglais »

Welcome.

I think you have a BMC factory rebuild, I believe I am right in saying that these were on an exchange basis, via BMC dealerships/approved workshops of the time. The relevant stamps on your current engine (AA) denote standard bore and standard crank journal size (at time of rebuild), so they weren't redone. Being a BMC rebuild number predates the Unipart changeover to RKM/SKM and similar codes, so that would be pre 1980-ish latest, probably a lot earlier as I'm not sure that BMC would have continually supported the 803 for that long, so any rebuild data is pretty much invalid as the engine is likely to have been in the car since before the last Morris rolled off the line in 1971 (unless you've been lucky and it has been dry stored and fitted recently). So I would take the 'gold seal' aspect with a pinch of salt, particularly with an 803cc with the weaker bottom end.

The plate is obviously the original engine number. All dealer fitted/sourced replacement engines have a new number, it won't be (or can never rationally be proved to be) your original engine.

Is it definitely an 803? (Spin on lookalike oil filter in side of block). Not uncommon to have had an engine change to a 948 (or even 1098) easily noticed by remote style canister oil filter lower down the block.



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womble63
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Re: ENGINE NUMBER

Post by womble63 »

thanks for your help thats great news as know nothink about these engines as not a car person and been building bikes for 40 years, are these engines worth keeping im not bothered about power but everone keeps saying change it for somethink bigger as its out the car will it hurt the value of the car as its ment to be a 803 in there
many thanks again for the reply

andy



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plastic orange
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Re: ENGINE NUMBER

Post by plastic orange »

Hi and welcome. Engine size should be stamped on the engine block. An 803 is a weak engine and is painfully slow, and if the engine you have is stamped 950 or 1100 then that is a bonus. As far as originality is concerned, you may find that having a larger engine (still an A series) may make the car more saleable.

PO


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Mecanglais
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Re: ENGINE NUMBER

Post by Mecanglais »

The 803 is easily identified by the oil filter arrangement as I stated above.

It depends entirely on what you want to use it for, if you roll it out once a year, an 803 is fine. If you plan on doing anything over, say, 800 miles a year or so, a 948 would be a good investment. Given that your 803 is not the original engine to your Morris anyway, you won't lose much, you can always keep the engine in the shed should you want to sell it. A 948 can be picked up cheaply, I would stick with the 948 as it will be kinder to the original 803cc gearbox than the 1098.

As PO says, 803's have a weak bottom end and you can only expect them to realistically achieve around 80,000 miles before the crank needs work, even with regular servicing.



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womble63
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Re: ENGINE NUMBER

Post by womble63 »

its only got just under 40,000 on the clocks and i have 16 bikes 2 trikes and a microcar so be lucky to do 1000 miles a year in it i dont realy care about speed as have my bikes for that so im gona keep to the 803 and put it back in once i have gave it a good look over as might change top end to unleaded as been told the valves are to soft and its been sitting for a while so might have a look at pistons and rings
thanks again for all the help not use to bying somethink where the chasey and engine numbers dont match and was very weary as there just a rivited tag
andy



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Mecanglais
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Re: ENGINE NUMBER

Post by Mecanglais »

You should find that the 'serial number' (for want of a better description, the last digits of the VIN) stamped on the firewall, on the engine bay side, around where the bonnet pull rod passes through. You may need to move your coil, it might be obstructing it.

Might have 40k on the clocks, or 140k, or 240k :D Only way to confirm mileage is if backed up with paperwork.

Engine numbers rarely match on these, having been around for 60 years plus, they are only on a rivetted tag as you say.

I would say you are fine to use unleaded fuel with no other preparation or additive, particularly with such short mileage, but if you are having the head machined for another reason it certainly won't do it any harm.

You can always look for a 948 while you are running yours, they are about and reasonably cheap, you may already have one which is why it's worth checking the oil filter location. There is nothing particularly involved in the swap from 803/948, probably better with 1098 HS2 carb and manifolds for ease of use, but it should be as simple as changing the engine. I think the 948 and 803 use the same backplate and flywheel anyway, but if not they are compatible and just switch them over.



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