Replacing a 1098 clutch

Standard & modified running gear
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Custard
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Re: Replacing a 1098 clutch

Post by Custard »

Gearbox out used to be the only option when working on the street with no access to lifting gear.

With lifting gear you can remove the engine without taking the front panel off, especially if you remove the fan.

I never found aligning them up to go back in particularly difficult and would just do the engine only having supported the gearbox on wood blocks before moving the engine forward, otherwise you have all the same issues with gearbox cross member, prop, speedo cable. You should slacken off the clutch adjuster before fitting with a new clutch and readjust when all is back together.

If you leave the gearbox in gear when you slide the engine back in you can turn the engine to get the splines too mate up, very easy if you have removed the plugs to get rid of the engine compression.

I find it all ok, but take your time ensuring the clutch is centralised, old gearbox, just the input shaft or dowel or a socket extension bar and plenty of insulating tape all do the trick and check and recheck as you tighten the clutch to flywheel bolts evenly and slowly.

Sean.



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MM
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Re: Replacing a 1098 clutch

Post by MM »

It is possible to remove the engine as far as you need to in order to change a clutch with careful use of a trolley jack to slide it off the gearbox then raise it so the sump is above the level of the front crossmember, and slide it over that onto supporting blocks of wood or similar; of course, you need to move the front brake pipe out of the way as far as possible, by undoing the brake switch/pipe union where it bolts to the crossmember.

I managed to change my worn release bearing in a weekend on a driveway with this method.

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Maurice, Kent.
1970 Trafalgar Blue Traveller

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emjay
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Re: Replacing a 1098 clutch

Post by emjay »

It sounds like you don't have a means to lift the engine. The workshop manual details removal of the the engine alone with the grill panel in place by pulling forward and rotating the engine 90°. I tried it once. It's possible but difficult. That is with lifting capability. I mention it because it requires the engine to travel far enough forward to clear the input shaft of the gearbox, which is what you are asking. I'd say in theory, it may be possible but make sure you have some extra help to stabilize the engine because some wrestling will be required. Check the clearance between sump and cross member.

Someone told me once that he stood on the wings with a chain around his shoulders and lifted the engine while his buddy worked on the engine.(and gearbox possibly) He was a boastful sort of chap.



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MM
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Re: Replacing a 1098 clutch

Post by MM »

Certainly sounds like a nice way to ruin your front wings and quite possibly your back, if ever I heard one... :roll:


Maurice, Kent.
1970 Trafalgar Blue Traveller

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Custard
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Re: Replacing a 1098 clutch

Post by Custard »

I have been party to doing it with 3 people 2 holding the engine on a scaffolding bar while the 3rd stops it swinging.

The wing story would be more plausible if you put a foot in the engine bay either side . I have seen that done just to free it from the engine mountings. Someone in a lock up with no big levers and unable to loosen the engine mounting turret.

None of it advisable on a nice classic. Things were different when £200 would get a car with 12 months MOT and you would haggle at the scrap yard that an engine was only worth £25 not £30 and a Gearbox was expensive at £20.

Sean.



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pamorrisguy
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Re: Replacing a 1098 clutch

Post by pamorrisguy »

A few years ago I changed transmissions about four times till I got a good one that shifted well and was nice and quiet. It was on a fresh restoration so crossmember removal wasn't an issue. It's definitely not a pleasant experience but it was favorable just because I wasn't interested in pulling the motor from a freshly painted truck. If I remember correctly the steering rack was in the way so the box would have to be pulled past the locating pins then spun so that the top of the transmission would clearthe rack then slid out the rest of the way. Once you do it a couple times it can be done fairly quickly.



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Custard
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Re: Replacing a 1098 clutch

Post by Custard »

Yes that's the way, its just remembering which way to twist it when you cant see too well. Its to the right to lower the starter hump.

Need to watch the engine tilt so the heater valve doesn't get bashed and if on the single blade fan move it horizontal so the lower one doesn't get too close to the radiator.

Luckily the Moggy box is one of the lightest I have come across.

Sean.



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pamorrisguy
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Re: Replacing a 1098 clutch

Post by pamorrisguy »

I forgot about the heater valve and fan blades, definitely want to keep a close eye on them. Also a good idea to leave the transmission in gear so if you need to turn the output shaft to align the splines. Your right they are luckily a light trans :D



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Mecanglais
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Re: Replacing a 1098 clutch

Post by Mecanglais »

Gearbox out is entirely possible but for me unless you know the crossmember mounts to be in good nick, I would always change a clutch by removing the engine, particularly without access to a ramp. Spinning bolts in the chassis leg (especially under the master cylinder) are less than fun.

It reminds me of when I changed the gearbox over in my Traveller, it was a cold November evening, I had to do it on a steep driveway (nose facing uphill) with little more than metric hand tools, a fatigued trolley jack and one axle stand. Managed to get the box out fairly easily in the limited space, unfortunately it took me as long to get the bloody thing out from under the car, whichever angle it went to, the bell housing was always around an inch too big to slide under the chassis leg.

Having got thoroughly annoyed by this point I steamed on and shoved the new box in, jacked it all up and refitted the mounts/crossmember/prop etc. Come to refit the relay shaft, it was only then that it dawned on me that in my haste I had forgotten to take the clutch fork out of the old gearbox... :oops:



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