The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Larger 4 cylinder engines, body mods, major brake and handling modifications.
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MM
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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Post by MM »

welltravellered wrote:
Stevebee wrote:Great work. What will you be using for a speedo
I'll be using the liana speedometer for now. When funds allow I want to get one of those smiths electronic speedometers they do for minis.
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Strangely enough, I quite like that digital instruments cluster - it looks very futuristic in a Minor!


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Sleeper
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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Post by Sleeper »

+1 Keep it...

John ;-)



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welltravellered
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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

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Stevebee wrote:Have you finished the car and is it on the road
Not quite finished. I made a mock-up propshaft and have driven it up and down the driveway. I need to get a propshaft made but I can't do it just yet as I've just realised why the rear springs are wonky. One of the shackle mounting holes is 20mm too far back...………………...



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welltravellered
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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Post by welltravellered »

MM wrote:
welltravellered wrote:
Stevebee wrote:Great work. What will you be using for a speedo
I'll be using the liana speedometer for now. When funds allow I want to get one of those smiths electronic speedometers they do for minis.
20200208_120717.jpg
Strangely enough, I quite like that digital instruments cluster - it looks very futuristic in a Minor!
I like it too, but the original speedo not working is going to bug me too much. Also I haven't finalised how to mount the speed sensor yet, the gearbox doesn't have a speed sensor, on the Jimny it's located in the transfer box.



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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Post by MM »

I was wondering, if you weighed the Minor's original engine & box to compare it with the weight of the Suzuki engine & box?

I'm guessing the Suzuki engine has an alloy head, which should help reduce weight somewhat...


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welltravellered
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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Post by welltravellered »

MM wrote:I was wondering, if you weighed the Minor's original engine & box to compare it with the weight of the Suzuki engine & box?

I'm guessing the Suzuki engine has an alloy head, which should help reduce weight somewhat...
Alloy block too. I took rough measurements with bathroom scales as I went along. I don't have the numbers to hand but I know that the engine is about 10kg lighter than the a-series, and the gearbox is about 10kg heavier, so overall no change in weight but a slight shift backwards for weight distribution.



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Mecanglais
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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Post by Mecanglais »

I'm sure someone will be along with a link soon but I've seen before that you can get a plate to sandwich between the prop yoke flange and the diff with tabs (that you adjust by folding some flat), these read with a sensor, like an ABS sensor in a hub. Maybe Car Builder Solutions stock one. In case you can't find a conventional Speedo drive.

Looking good by the way, an intriguing project.



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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Post by MM »

welltravellered wrote: Alloy block too. I took rough measurements with bathroom scales as I went along. I don't have the numbers to hand but I know that the engine is about 10kg lighter than the a-series, and the gearbox is about 10kg heavier, so overall no change in weight but a slight shift backwards for weight distribution.
Sounds ideal, from the point of keeping the weight distribution about right; Minors and Marinas were known to be a bit front-heavy, and understeer a fair bit.


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welltravellered
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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

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chesney wrote:I'm sure someone will be along with a link soon but I've seen before that you can get a plate to sandwich between the prop yoke flange and the diff with tabs (that you adjust by folding some flat), these read with a sensor, like an ABS sensor in a hub. Maybe Car Builder Solutions stock one. In case you can't find a conventional Speedo drive.

Looking good by the way, an intriguing project.
Thanks very much, if you find the product it'd be interested. The trigger wheel on the Liana diff has 16 teeth, so with a 3.9 diff ratio, 4 teeth on a propshaft trigger would be nearly right. I wondered if the sensor would work just 'reading' the bolts on the propshaft yoke.



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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Post by Mecanglais »

I haven't found it as yet but I will keep digging.
You've already looked into it, but from what I can gather electric Speedo kits are just a simple reed switch, but mounting on the prop would need careful calibrating as (as you quite rightly point out) it is not proportionate to wheel speed.

I'm sure I've seen it somewhere that this kit can be calibrated within reason by folding the tabs on the prop plate so as to change the readings per revolution of the prop and 'convert' to wheel speed, again, I will have to do some digging!

What axle have/will you use? Maybe a magnet mounted to a brake drum (with a counterweight on the opposite side) and a sensor on the backplate would work, a similar principle (or maybe the same kit) as a motorbike front wheel?

This is all assuming that this can be made to work with whichever speedo you use of course!



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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

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I want to get it working with the Liana speedo initially because the ECU also uses the speed signal for some unknown function, and will throw a fault if the speed signal is missing.



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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

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Continuing the story, the fuel system was next. I obtained a fuel pump from some random '90s Suzuki and made a hole in the fuel tank to fit. I'd really like to make a sump in the bottom of the tank for the pump to sit in, but my welding skills aren't up to the task. For the time being I've made in in-tank surge vessel sump thing, copying something I saw in the internet. An in line filter and some copper pipes completed the system.
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MM
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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

Post by MM »

Looks like it should work pretty well. I hope you managed to remove all the swarf, etc. out of the tank...


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welltravellered
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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

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Next job was to swap the 1.3 engine to the Liana 1.6 engine. After fitting the front panels, the engine bay now looks like this:
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I desoldered the hose spigots from the radiator, cut off the bend, then soldered them back on.

I re-used the Liana battery because it has smaller terminals and the Liana battery leads seem to fit quite well. It's a tiny battery, I think they get away with it because it has a gear reduction starter motor as standard.



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Re: The reasonably priced engine conversion.

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Next was electrics. I was looking forward to this bit. The plan is to use the Liana ECU which means retaining the immobiliser and associated wiring. I initially made a bracket to attach the Suzuki ignition switch to the column but I didn't like it so re-did it to use the minor switch on the dash. This means the immobiliser sensor has been hidden behind the dash with the Suzuki key taped to it. I'll work out a system for conveniently removing the Suzuki key when I want to park the car in less salubrious areas. I also wanted to retain the engine loom as it is so I did. It's possible to unplug the engine loom from the ECU etc, pull it through the bulkhead and remove the engine. The dashboard loom was a different story. I pulled off all the tape, then plugged it all in and made sure the engine would start. That left me with this:
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The ECU is mounted behind the dash on the drivers side where the glovebox used to be. Using the official Suzuki manual I then went through each wire and decided if I needed it or not, and got rid of the rats nest. The oil and alternator lights on the Minor dash now work, the only warning lights on the Liana dash I need are the water temp warning, check engine light, and immobiliser warning lamp. Japanese cars also seem to have a blue lamp to tell you that the engine is cold.

I got rid of the in car Liana fuse box and utilised some spare fuses in a fusebox I had installed in the dynamo control box a few years ago.
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