Rear shoe adjustment.

Rebuilding, adjusting, maintaining & alternatives
Post Reply
User avatar
timb02
.
Great Britain
Posts: 24
Joined: 1 year ago
Location: norfolk

Rear shoe adjustment.

Post by timb02 »

Well after a long layoff due to the pestilence in our land I gave the traveller a once over and have had a couple of short runs out. Oh happy day. All is not as it should be in the stop department though. When we got Dorris I gave her a once over and the rear brake shoes were on the maximum adjustment and could have done with a bit more. I ordered new shoes from ESM as the drums looked fine and measured 7". The new shoes are hardly better and are just about on the limit already before bedding in. I know the previous owner fitted new cylinders from Bull motive. I suspect that either the shoes or cylinders are not up to snuff, however I would appreciate any advice on things I may have missed? thanks in advance.
Tim



User avatar
Mecanglais
Formally known as chesney
France
Posts: 2201
Joined: 9 years ago
Location: France

Contribution Stars

Re: Rear shoe adjustment.

Post by Mecanglais »

I have worn adjusters before now. Equally I have had poorly fitting cylinders.
Two options - either pack out with aluminium shims (bent to a 'U' to locate on the adjuster) between the cylinder and adjuster, or fit a set of front adjusters on the rear brakes, which are compatible but larger.



User avatar
Custard
.
Ireland
Posts: 2435
Joined: 8 years ago
Location: Blackpool

Contribution Stars

Re: Rear shoe adjustment.

Post by Custard »

I actually think it is a problem with the shoes.

I have had a few where the most of the adjustment is taken up straight away, fronts as well before going to discs.

My theory is that the metal part is the same size it has always been and that now with bonded on linings you are getting less thickness of pad material.

Years ago, (when Moggy's were invented) the linings were riveted on so had to have a certain amount under the head of the rivet to hold it on, the thickness of the head of the rivet, then some material for braking for a few thousand miles.

It could be age, but I do think you are getting less pad material than you used to, but you get the same or better miles because they are possibly harder wearing as there is no longer asbestos in them and also you can now wear them down to the backing or until you run out of adjustment rather than until you start polishing the rivets.

There is a 3rd option to be used with caution as we are dealing with brakes and that is to pack out the non adjuster end. A single strip of steel bent like a staple to go round the seat will spread the non moving end of the shoes apart slightly.

The problem with all the adjustment being at one end on a leading/trailing shoe combination is that adjusting even further can get the correct travel but the brakes are little better or even worse that the ones removed as only the end of the shoes near the adjuster are touching the drum. These then wear quite quickly, but as they do more and more of the shoes touch and the brakes actually get better as the edges near the adjuster get tapered and the middles start becoming more useful.

Because of this I try never to put new shoes on before an MOT as they take a while to wear in.

Its a shame there was never a popular rear disc conversion, drums are a right pain really.

Also you can't have twin leading shoe brakes on the back to help solve the problem as they are already terrible in reverse. Going forwards you have 6 leading and 2 trailing shoes and in reverse 2 leading and 6 trailing shoes. I didn't fully appreciate that when I was 17 so Tree 1 Moggy 0. :oops:

Sean.



User avatar
Mecanglais
Formally known as chesney
France
Posts: 2201
Joined: 9 years ago
Location: France

Contribution Stars

Re: Rear shoe adjustment.

Post by Mecanglais »

I didn't fully appreciate that when I was 17 so Tree 1 Moggy 0. :oops:
All been there :lol:

My grandfather makes brake shoes to original pattern, he has lining material going back to 1900, when as I understand it, it was a form of compressed cork! He remakes brake shoes for me, I trust his judgement over anything that comes out of a box, unless I am desperate. He has references to most vehicles up to 1990 or so in regards to lining depth, width, rivet depth etc. He remade the rear shoes in mine, both when I had the standard 7" and when I had the Wolseley 8" drums on the back. One of the 7" drums used to always spin over the adjuster slot, my solution was to fit 8" adjusters and file the shoe adjuster slot out marginally.
I do wonder if the slot in the bottom of the cylinder to take the lower shoe is cut too far on replacements sometimes, but I've never had an original and a repro pattern/genuine to compare.

There is also wear on the drum to consider as well, but having read the reports on the quality of replacement drums, unless your drums are absolutely knackered I would keep them and pack out your adjusters in some way rather than rectify anything else.



User avatar
MM
.
United Kingdom
Posts: 3803
Joined: 9 years ago

Re: Rear shoe adjustment.

Post by MM »

I have also heard of folk using a blob of MIG-weld to build up the shoe metal by the adjuster slot.

I took my Traveller for a spin this weekend, after a few weeks of non-use. The brakes were rather wooden at first, and the handbrake has become pretty ineffective, so may well need looking at...


Maurice, Kent.
1970 Trafalgar Blue Traveller

http://retrorides.proboards.com/index.c ... read=37056" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Post Reply