Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Finishing, Windows, Hoods & Trav wood etc

Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby TeHoro » Fri Apr 27, 2018 7:58 pm

That's rather ugly! Looks like some welding is in your future.

I'm in denial a bit over some wood rot in my woody, but I'm fairly confident that it hasn't been visited by Mr Bodger previously.
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Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby Panky » Sat Apr 28, 2018 9:52 am

It gets worse :( Took the door and sill cover off to find a patched up boxing plate and a sill finisher and bottom of the 'B' post made mostly of filler. I haven't poked too much around the under sill sections but they feel suspiciously thick :roll:
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Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby Plin » Sat Apr 28, 2018 2:24 pm

:? :( 'rotten' luck finding more bodging.....will you get a chance to escape the garage soon?!
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Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby Panky » Mon May 14, 2018 2:32 pm

An attempt was made to repair the boxing panel but then the step was filled with filler - why go to the trouble of recreating the boxing plate then do that :roll: He must have got fed up

well disguised with about half a kilo of bodge
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The finisher along the edge was about 50% filler and 20% metal - the rest was rust.
On the positive side the petrol tank opening is great, I could sit and look at it all day

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But my eyes keep being drawn to things like this :(

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In other news, after deciding to do the floors as well as the sills, I thought I might as well replace the crossmember too. Obviously this meant taking the tension off the torsion bars - easy, done it a few times. Unfortunately the bottom trunnion bolt was jammed in and as I was levering the suspension arm off it the arm slipped off the jack and whacked me on the back of the hand, OUCH. I pulled my glove off expecting to see the bones sticking though my flesh but no bones luckily just a nasty looking gash. I was so lucky nothing broken (except the skin) but one hell of a bruise and what looked like a piece of minced beef poking out the back of my hand. Still on the mend now, still a bit stiff but lesson well and truly learned.
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Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby don58van » Tue May 15, 2018 9:14 am

Hi Panky
I'm sorry to hear of your accident. It sounds like a quite a nasty injury--what a relief that there were no broken bones in addition to the gash.

I have had situations where the jack under the front arm(s) has slipped too. Luckily I haven't been injured. I think most Minors owners who have worked on the front suspension have probably had a near miss at one time or another.

There is an intrinsic problem when jacking under the arms in that they are not parallel to the ground but slope upwards toward the centre of the car. This, as we have all found means that the jack tends to slide toward the centre of the car.

I note that the Post Office Vans had attachments on the outer area of the arms that were designed to stop the jack from sliding. I wish that the arms had been designed in the first place to provide positive location of jacks.

Anyway, I wish you a speedy recovery from your injury.

All the best
Don
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Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby Panky » Tue May 15, 2018 2:09 pm

Cheers Don. Healing nicely, soon be back on the car.
I'm sure there's a special tool mentioned in the workshop manual, I'll have a look.
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Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby Panky » Tue May 15, 2018 2:28 pm

The manual does mention a special jack pad but the diagram isn't very clear - anyone got a picture of what one looks like please.
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Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby Custard » Tue May 15, 2018 3:22 pm

No picture, but looking at the manual I think it has a vertical fork so that one prong goes up in the space between the trunnion and the two halves of the arm.

I posted a picture when I did mine and I used to try and get under the end of the cast arm on its own allowing me to remove the front arm and trunnion.

ChrisRyder commented though that you are often going to remove the upper one anyway in which case you can jack under the trunnion. Remove the top joint and then lower it down.

I found it to work, but I needed to use a lever to get the top trunnion off its pin.

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Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby emjay » Tue May 15, 2018 4:48 pm

I'm considering making a member that would replace the front arm and would extend out past the hub to provide a dedicated jack point or just plain leverage in order to have better control when pulling the lower pin. Next would be another part to add to aid in removal and re-insertion of the inner pin and rear arm.
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Re: Time For Some Serious Woodwork

Postby Custard » Fri May 18, 2018 9:34 pm

Once all the tension is out of the bar the inner pin (I presume by inner you mean the one on the end of the torsion bar that goes through the eyebolt on the chassis) may be difficult the first time, but if the splines are wire brushed and the cup cleaned then reassembled with copper slip subsequent adjustments are quite easy, especially if the eye bolt is slackened slightly so it can twist.

First time usually requires a bit of penetrating oil and your favourite persuader (lump hammer).

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